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Photographs from the 1960s at ‘The Loco’, by Hylton Holt

I have a few photos, of not terribly good quality, taken at 34F in ‘62 and ‘63 plus some taken just post closure in Sept ‘63 and a couple of steam in what remained of the yard in May ‘64. I’d be happy to scan them if they are of any interest.

So wrote Hylton Holt of Belper, Derbyshire.

Hylton has kindly encouraged us to share his photos.  The evocative atmosphere of Grantham Loco in its declining years and months comes over in the pictures.  They capture the excitement of ‘unofficial’ shed visits, with shots quickly grabbed when opportunity arose.  In such circumstances capturing the mood of the moment is more important than technical quality.  Today, of course, there’s much that can be done using digital technology to get the best from pictures that may not, at first sight, appear particularly promising.

But first, here are Hylton’s reflections on visiting Grantham – both back then and more recently.

I was a spotter from Coventry - but fortunately I had an aunt and uncle in Grantham. An early memory: I was taken to the shed yard at Grantham by my Dad and Uncle in the summer of ’56. People in the town used to do that as an evening promenade. We were offered a footplate ride round the triangle. The loco had a rather open cab so I think it was probably a J6 or an O2. The crew talked about which television sets they owned - which seemed quite inapt to my 8-year-old ears.

We used to travel by bus from Coventry via Leicester. ‘Midland Red’ to Leicester and ‘Lincoln Green’ from there to Grantham. (It wasn’t until years later that I found out quite how Croxton Kerrial was spelled and quite what Flying Childers was!)

A few years on and we stopped with my aunt and uncle for a week in April ’62. Several visits to the shed were made with friends Dave Hawkins and Graham Roberts. Still a lot of steam action then. K3s were still coming up from Colwick. It’s not until the 47s come in en masse in early ‘63 that brought about the end of steam on the GNR, though steam still got south of Peterborough ‘til early ’65.

Now this is real rivet counting but I do have a note, somewhere, of the water treatment plant Sludge Tender numbers…

In summer 1964, realising that it was all over at Grantham so far as steam was concerned, I put together an album of all the photos Dave, Graham and I had taken at 34F.  I wrote a caption for each of the photos.  Here are a couple of page openings from this treasured volume:

Pages 4 and 5 of my album Grantham Photos, 34F. Photographs by Hylton Holt.
Pages 4 and 5.
On pages 36 and 37 are these two photos taken by Graham Roberts on 16th March 1963, just six months before the shed closed.
On pages 36 and 37 are these two photos taken by Graham Roberts on 16th March 1963, just six months before the shed closed.

So glad that I made contact. I was concerned that on my demise these photos’d just be lost. I’ve also tried to throw in a bit of ‘history’ ‘cos that’d be lost too. Did anyone know that those sidings were called ‘Coronation’? We lose such ‘history’ at our peril. I, for instance, binned all of my diesel era notebooks during a house move. All those Summer Saturdays at New Street surrounded by Peaks, 47s, 50s, 31s, 37s and 25s – that’s not even mentioning the massed ranks of 86s and 87s. You could spend years at New Street now and not see a single loco. All history.

I was at the Mallard 75 weekend at Grantham on 7th September last year. I’d already decided to go over for the 50th anniversary of the shed’s closure and then the Mallard visit was added. Yes, a good day. I forced my chums to accompany me round The Brambles, the estate that was finally built on the shed site. ECML staff at the station were charming, “Have you got all the leaflets gentlemen?” and I thanked them for their evident enthusiasm. Me and my chums lunched in The Angel & Royal - I always try and do that as it was “not for the likes o’you” when a child. A family group of ‘normals’ asked, “Have you come for the train?” And me without so much as a multi coloured ball point about me! And a group of non-gricer people of both genders discussed Deltic names. Nice feeling.

 

Me as fireman on Collett tank No.5643 at Wirksworth last summer, Ecclesbourne Valley Railway
Me as fireman on Collett tank No.5643 at Wirksworth in summer 2013, Ecclesbourne Valley Railway.
Photograph by David Styles.

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Wednesday 25th April 1962

In a nice view against the light ('contre jour', as they say in photographic circles) A3 No. 60108 Gay Crusader of New England, Peterborough (34E) receives attention from the driver before taking to the triangle on Wednesday 25th April 1962; in the distance another loco nears the end of its trip round the triangle. Photograph by Hylton Holt.
In a nice view against the light ('contre jour', as they say in photographic circles) A3 No. 60108 Gay Crusader of New England, Peterborough (34E) receives attention from the driver before taking to the triangle on Wednesday 25th April 1962; in the distance another loco nears the end of its trip round the triangle.
Photograph by Hylton Holt.
Class A3 No. 60111 Enterprise of Grantham shed (34F) stands outside the top shed on the afternoon of Wednesday 25th April 1962. Photograph by Hylton Holt.
Class A3 No. 60111 Enterprise of Grantham shed (34F) stands outside the top shed on the afternoon of Wednesday 25th April 1962.
Photograph by Hylton Holt.
Class L1 No.67757 (34F) with a WD and an O2 on the east Coronation siding on Wednesday 25th April 1962. The L1s were another of Thompson's rip roaring successes - they thrashed themselves to bits, being built to a very low spec. As the man said, 'From the rear they looked like a self-propelled Dub Dee tender.' Being from the land of Fowler and Stanier I loved 'em! Photograph by Hylton Holt.
Class L1 No.67757 (34F) with a WD and an O2 on the east Coronation siding on Wednesday 25th April 1962.
The L1s were another of Thompson's rip roaring successes - they thrashed themselves to bits, being built to a very low spec. As the man said, 'From the rear they looked like a self-propelled Dub Dee tender.' Being from the land of Fowler and Stanier I loved 'em!
Photograph by Hylton Holt.

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Thursday 26th April 1962

WD No.90730, based at New England shed, Peterborough (34E), is on the east Coronation siding at Grantham on the morning of Thursday 26th April 1962, along with an O2 loco. The clean condition of No 90730's paintwork is because it was only a few weeks out of Gorton Works, Manchester following an ovehaul. These heavy freight engines were seldom kept clean at the sheds. Photograph by Hylton Holt.
WD No.90730, based at New England shed, Peterborough (34E), is on the east Coronation siding at Grantham on the morning of Thursday 26th April 1962, along with an O2 loco.
No 90730's paintwork is unusually clean because it was only a few weeks out of Gorton Works in Manchester following an overhaul. These heavy freight engines were seldom kept clean once back at the sheds.
Photograph by Hylton Holt.
A class L1 tank (number unknown) on the Coronation siding on the morning of Thursday 26th April 1962. Photograph by Hylton Holt.
A class L1 tank (number unknown) on the Coronation siding on the morning of Thursday 26th April 1962.
Photograph by Hylton Holt.
Class V2 No.60950 of Grantham shed (34F) outside the top shed on the morning of 26th April 1962. The wagons on the siding behind carry the shed's supply of locomotive coal. Photograph by Hylton Holt.
Class V2 No.60950 of Grantham shed (34F) outside the top shed on the morning of 26th April 1962. The wagons on the siding behind carry the shed's supply of locomotive coal.
Photograph by Hylton Holt.

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Saturday 28th April 1962

Class B1 No.61389 of Grantham shed (34F) at the northern end of the shed yard on the morning of Saturday 28th April 1962. The fairly rare breed of Grantham B1 is seen in pretty good external condition. This is the view you got when entering the shed yard from the north. A grand parade! My now cruelly late friend Dave Hawkins lurks on the left - looks bl**dy cold. Photograph by Hylton Holt.
Class B1 No.61389 of Grantham shed (34F) at the northern end of the shed yard on the morning of Saturday 28th April 1962. The fairly rare breed of Grantham B1 is seen in pretty good external condition. This is the view you got when entering the shed yard from the north.  A grand parade! My now cruelly late friend Dave Hawkins lurks on the left - looks bl**dy cold. Dave took a number of the photos in this album.
Roy Vinter has written about No.61389 here.
Photograph by Hylton Holt.
Class V2 locomotive No.60809 The Snapper The East Yorkshire Regiment The Duke of York's Own of Darlington (51A) outside the shed on the morning of Saturday 28th April 1962. In the foreground is a stack of new cast iron locomotive brake blocks. Photograph by Hylton Holt.
Class V2 locomotive No.60809 The Snapper The East Yorkshire Regiment The Duke of York's Own of Darlington (51A) outside the shed on the morning of Saturday 28th April 1962. In the foreground is a stack of new cast iron locomotive brake blocks.
Photograph by Hylton Holt.
Class V2 No.60809 The Snapper The East Yorkshire Regiment The Duke of York's Own of Darlington shed (51A) is outside the top shed on the morning of Saturday 28th April 1962. Photograph by Hylton Holt.
A second view of Class V2 No.60809 The Snapper The East Yorkshire Regiment The Duke of York's Own of Darlington shed (51A) outside the top shed on the morning of Saturday 28th April 1962.
Photograph by Hylton Holt.

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Sunday 29th April 1962

O2 No.63976 of Retford (36E) is on the eastern 'Coronation' siding at Grantham shed on Sunday 29th April 1962. In the forground is part of the stack of coal kept in reserve. Photograph by Hylton Holt.
Class O2 No.63976 of Retford (36E) is on the eastern 'Coronation' siding at Grantham shed on Sunday 29th April 1962. In the foreground is part of the stack of coal kept in reserve.
Photograph by Hylton Holt.
After scaling the 12-foot high stack of coal held in reserve, Hylton's friend Dave Hawkins took this shot of Class L1 No.67796 of Grantham (34F) at the Springfield Road end of the eastern Coronation siding on Sunday 29th April 1962. Further along are a WD and an O2, No.63976. Note that the coal stacks are still intact: The End isn't quite nigh. Photograph by Dave Hawkins, collection of Hylton Holt.
After scaling the 12-foot high stack of coal held in reserve, my friend Dave Hawkins took this shot of Class L1 No.67796 of Grantham (34F) at the Springfield Road end of the eastern Coronation siding on Sunday 29th April 1962. Further along are a WD and an O2, No.63976. Note that the coal stacks are still intact: The End isn't quite nigh.
Photograph by Dave Hawkins, collection of Hylton Holt.
A3 No.60049 Galtee More, V2 No.60809 The Snapper The East Yorkshire Regiment The Duke of York's Own, L1 and WD locos at the Top Shed at Grantham on 29th April 1962. This photograph was taken from the inclined loco coal siding, the track of which is in the foreground. Photograph by Hylton Holt.
Class A3 No.60049 Galtee More of Grantham (34F), V2 No.60809 The Snapper The East Yorkshire Regiment The Duke of York's Own visiting from Darlington (51A), L1 and WD locos at the Top Shed at Grantham on 29th April 1962.  This is a view from the inclined loco coal siding, the track of which is in the foreground.
Photograph by Hylton Holt.
Class A3 No.60049 Galtee More of Grantham shed (34F) outside the shed, alongside V2 No.60809, on the morning of Sunday 29th April 1962. Photograph by Dave Hawkins, collection of Hylton Holt.
Class A3 No.60049 Galtee More of Grantham shed (34F) outside the shed, alongside V2 No.60809, on the morning of Sunday 29th April 1962.
Photograph by Dave Hawkins, collection of Hylton Holt.

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Saturday 16th March 1963

A3 No.60056 'Centenary' of Grantham (34F) at the north end of the shed yard on the morning of Saturday 16th March 1963. In steam, coaled up and apparently in use as standby loco (Down Pilot). Always liked this pic despite the telegraph pole and signals sprouting from 60056. The loco was withdrawn two months later. Photograph by Hylton Holt.
Class A3 No.60056 'Centenary' of Grantham (34F) at the north end of the shed yard on the morning of Saturday 16th March 1963. In steam, coaled up and apparently in use as standby loco (Down Pilot). Always liked this pic despite the telegraph pole and signals sprouting from 60056. The loco was withdrawn two months later.
Photograph by Hylton Holt.
Class A3 No.60106 Flying Fox, with GNR tender, near the coal stage ramp and apparently ready for work (as Up Pilot) on Saturday 16th March 1963. In the left background is No.60056 Centenary. Photograph by Hylton Holt.
Class A3 No.60106 Flying Fox, with GNR tender, near the coal stage ramp and apparently ready for work (as Up Pilot) on Saturday 16th March 1963. In the left background is No.60056 Centenary.
Photograph by Hylton Holt.
O2 No.63939 (with GNR cab) near the end of its trip round the triangle. Note also A3s 60054 (left) and 60106 (right) in the background. Hylton Holt in foreground! Saturday 16th March 1963. Couple of points re this shot - the Fireman is very young, and looks shockingly 'long haired' for the time (don't forget at this time we've barely even heard of The Beatles). What happened to him after the 9th September that year? Note the white patch on the ground - and on my shoes. It's the sludge from the nearby water treatment tank. Roy Vinter adds: Looks to be coming off the 'angle, after turning. It's a bit odd that both men seem to be peering out the same side. One of them should really be the other side, making sure the road is clear and that there isn't another engine coming onto the 'angle as they're approaching the point, curving to the right, where they'll rejoin the entry road! The two A3s are the Main Line Pilots. Photograph by Graham Roberts, collection of Hylton Holt.
Class O2 No.63939 (with GNR cab) near the end of its trip round the triangle. Note also Class A3 locos No.60054 (left) and No.60106 (right) in the background. Hylton Holt in foreground! Saturday 16th March 1963.
Couple of points re this shot - the Fireman is very young, and looks shockingly 'long haired' for the time (don't forget at this time we've barely even heard of The Beatles). What happened to him after the 9th September that year? Note the white patch on the ground - and on my shoes. It's the sludge from the nearby water treatment tank.
Roy Vinter adds: Looks to be coming off the 'angle, after turning. It's a bit odd that both men seem to be peering out the same side. One of them should really be the other side, making sure the road is clear and that there isn't another engine coming onto the 'angle as they're approaching the point, curving to the right, where they'll rejoin the entry road! The two A3s are the Main Line Pilots.
Photograph by Graham Roberts, collection of Hylton Holt.
Class A3 locomotives No.60054 Prince of Wales, left, and No.60106 Flying Fox, right, both of Grantham shed (34F). No.60054 is on the 'triangle siding' and No.60106 is at the side of the coal stage ramp. Both were in steam and appeared to be on duty as standby (pilot) locos. Photograph by Graham Roberts, collection of Hylton Holt.
This shot was taken from roughly the point which the front of the O2 was passing in the photo above.
Class A3 locomotives No.60054 Prince of Wales, left, and No.60106 Flying Fox, right, both of Grantham shed (34F). No.60054 is on the 'triangle siding' and No.60106 is at the side of the coal stage ramp. Both were in steam and appeared to be on duty as standby (pilot) locos.
Photograph by Graham Roberts, collection of Hylton Holt.
O2 No.63968 of Grantham (34F) under the hoist alongside the west side of the top shed on Saturday 16th March 1963. The 'big freeze' has only just ended and the O2 bears scars of some heavy work from High Dyke, including ash still piled up beneath the smokebox door. Surely the most elegant of freight engines and all gone fifty years. Photograph by Hylton Holt.
Class O2 No.63968 of Grantham (34F) under the hoist alongside the west side of the top shed on Saturday 16th March 1963. The 'big freeze' has only just ended and the O2 bears scars of some heavy work from High Dyke, including ash still piled up beneath the smokebox door. Surely the most elegant of freight engines and all gone fifty years.
Photograph by Hylton Holt.
Class B1 No.61251 Oliver Bury of Grantham shed (34F) outside on the easternmost shed road on the afternoon of Saturday16th March 1963. The tender of No.60048 Doncaster is on the second road. Photograph by Graham Roberts, collection of Hylton Holt.
Class B1 No.61251 Oliver Bury of Grantham shed (34F) outside on the easternmost shed road on the afternoon of Saturday16th March 1963. The tender of No.60048 Doncaster is on the second road.
Photograph by Graham Roberts, collection of Hylton Holt.
Class O2 No.63960 of Grantham shed (34F) outside the top shed on Saturday 16th March 1963, its tender perhaps slightly over generously filled with coal in true Grantham tradition. On the left is LMS 4MT No.43111 and inside the shed No.43087. All three were in steam. Class A3 No.60048 'Doncaster' was on the far side of No.63960. Photograph by Hylton Holt.
Class O2 No.63960 of Grantham shed (34F) outside the top shed on Saturday 16th March 1963, its tender perhaps slightly over generously filled with coal in true Grantham tradition. On the left is LMS 4MT No.43111 and inside the shed No.43087. All three were in steam. Class A3 No.60048 'Doncaster' was on the far side of No.63960.
Photograph by Hylton Holt.
Possibly the least 'glamorous' aspect of the shed! Here is the east side of the top shed, showing how it was built with a 'temporary' corrugated iron wall in case any extension was built ...but of course it never was, and the old shed opposite the station remained in use until it practically fell down. The viewpoint is the top of one of the shed's two second world war air raid shelters - there was another shelter near the coaling plant. The corrugated asbestos shed could've been a bike shed but I've a vague feeling it stored gas cylinders too. The coal stacks have by now been cleared - the coal had long since gone blue. The sidings here were, I was told, called the 'Coronation Sidings' and you'll note the ramp leading to the mineral wagon just behind the bike shed? This was for a shed labourer called Alec (or Alex?) to trundle his wheelbarrow all the way from the ash pit and dump the contents into the waiting wagon. Um. I think 'laborious process' covers that. Locos visible are O2s Nos.69360 (outside shed) and 63943 on the west Coronation siding with WD No.90613. Saturday 16th March 1963. Photograph by Graham Roberts, collection of Hylton Holt.
Possibly the least 'glamorous' aspect of the shed! Here is the east side of the top shed, showing how it was built with a 'temporary' corrugated iron wall in case any extension was built ...but of course it never was, and the old shed opposite the station remained in use until it practically fell down. The viewpoint is the top of one of the shed's two second world war air raid shelters - there was another shelter near the coaling plant.
The corrugated asbestos shed could've been a bike shed but I've a vague feeling it stored gas cylinders too. The coal stacks have by now been cleared - the coal had long since gone blue. The sidings here were, I was told, called the 'Coronation Sidings' and you'll note the ramp leading to the mineral wagon just behind the bike shed? This was for a shed labourer called Alec (or Alex?) to trundle his wheelbarrow all the way from the ash pit and dump the contents into the waiting wagon. Um. I think 'laborious process' covers that.
Locos visible are O2s Nos.69360 (outside shed) and 63943 on the west Coronation siding with WD No.90613.
Saturday 16th March 1963.
Photograph by Graham Roberts, collection of Hylton Holt.
Class O2 No.63943 of Grantham shed (34F), with GNR cab and LNER tender, on the west Coronation siding at Grantham on Saturday 16th March 1963. Behind it are WD No.90613 and LMS 4MT No.43111. Photograph by Hylton Holt.
Class O2 No.63943 of Grantham shed (34F), with GNR cab and LNER tender, on the west Coronation siding at Grantham on Saturday 16th March 1963. Behind it are WD No.90613 and LMS 4MT No.43111.
Photograph by Hylton Holt.
Class O2 No.63943 of Grantham (34F) is 'dead' and WD No.90613 of New England, Peterborough (34E) is in steam on the west Coronation siding on Saturday 16th March 1963. Photograph by Graham Roberts, collection of Hylton Holt.
Class O2 No.63943 of Grantham (34F) is 'dead' and WD No.90613 of New England, Peterborough (34E) is in steam on the west Coronation siding on Saturday 16th March 1963.  "Shall we climb aboard to get a photo of the cab?  Quick, while there's nobody about!"
Photograph by Graham Roberts, collection of Hylton Holt.
The 'boiler front' of O2 No.63943 of Grantham (34F) with GNR cab, out of use on the west Coronation siding on Saturday 16th March 1963. It had been there for apparently a fortnight or so. According to the BRDatabase website No.63943 was at Doncaster Works for a Light Casual repair between 19th and 29th March 1963. On Easter Monday 16th April it was back at Grantham and in the same position. Photograph by Graham Roberts, collection of Hylton Holt.
The 'boiler front' of O2 No.63943 of Grantham (34F) with GNR cab, out of use on the west Coronation siding on Saturday 16th March 1963. It had been there for apparently a fortnight or so. According to the BRDatabase website No.63943 was at Doncaster Works for a Light Casual repair between 19th and 29th March 1963. On Easter Monday 16th April it was back at Grantham and in the same position.
Photograph by Graham Roberts, collection of Hylton Holt.
Looking north, WD No.90120 of Frodingham (36C) is on the ash pit and taking water at Grantham shed on Saturday 16th March 1963. Seemed WDs on 34F were usually Frodingham's. Alongside is a group of loco men in debate. At the coaling plant is an O2. Photograph by Hylton Holt.
Looking north, WD No.90120 of Frodingham (36C) is on the ash pit and taking water at Grantham shed on Saturday 16th March 1963. Seemed WDs on 34F were usually Frodingham's. Alongside is a group of loco men in debate. At the coaling plant is an O2.
Photograph by Hylton Holt.
Class O2 No. 63940 of Grantham shed (34F) with GNR cab and tender moving around the north end of the shed yard on Saturday 16th March 1963. Photograph by Hylton Holt.
Class O2 No. 63940 of Grantham shed (34F) with GNR cab and tender moving around the north end of the shed yard on Saturday 16th March 1963.
Photograph by Hylton Holt.
The eastern side of the old Great Northern Railway coal stage, photographed on Saturday 16th March 1963. Above the nearest window is one of two overhanging pivoted platforms from which skips of coal were emptied into locomotive tenders. The wheeled skips are in a row behind the railings, though they had not been used for many years. A loaded skip was pushed out onto the platform by one of the coaling stage men, where their loaded weight overcame counterbalance weights to tilt the platform outward. This discharged the coal into the tender below. Relieved of the weight of the coal, the balance weight returned the platform, and the skip was taken back for refilling from loco coal wagons at the back of the stage. Photograph by Graham Roberts, collection of Hylton Holt.
The eastern side of the old Great Northern Railway coal stage, photographed on Saturday 16th March 1963.
Above the nearest window is one of two overhanging pivoted platforms from which skips of coal were emptied into locomotive tenders. The wheeled skips are in a row behind the railings, though they had not been used for many years. A loaded skip was pushed out onto the platform by one of the coaling stage men, where their loaded weight overcame counterbalance weights to tilt the platform outward. This discharged the coal into the tender below. Relieved of the weight of the coal, the balance weight returned the platform, and the skip was taken back for refilling from loco coal wagons at the back of the stage.
Photograph by Graham Roberts, collection of Hylton Holt.

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 Sunday 22nd September 1963

This sequence of pictures is a record of the deserted shed three weeks after it closed.  The infrastructure remained intact, and these photographs reveal details of the buildings which were seldom glimpsed when locomotives and wagons occupied the tracks around them.

The yard of the shed on Sunday 22nd September 1963, 15 days after closure. In the yard are three New England-based diesel shunters, two of which are standing on the site of the old shed, and a Brush Type 4. Photograph by Hylton Holt.
The yard of the shed on Sunday 22nd September 1963, 15 days after closure. In the yard are three New England-based diesel shunters, two of which are standing on the site of the old shed, and a Brush Type 4.
Photograph by Hylton Holt.
The west side of the coal stage and, on the right, the mechanical coaling plant and the water treatment plant. In the foreground are the tracks leading to and from the turning triangle. We think the two sheds on the right, converted from old goods van bodies, were stores for the chemicals used in the water treatment plant. Does anyone know if that's right? Sunday 22nd September 1963. Photograph by Hylton Holt.
The west side of the coal stage and, on the right, the mechanical coaling plant and the water treatment plant. In the foreground are the tracks leading to and from the turning triangle. We think the two sheds on the right, converted from old goods van bodies, were stores for the chemicals used in the water treatment plant. Does anyone know if that's right? Sunday 22nd September 1963.
Photograph by Hylton Holt.
From left to right the water treatment plant, the coal stage and water tower, and the mechanical coaling plant. The mound beside the treatment plant tank is a wartime air raid shelter. Towards the camera and into the right foreground runs the eastern side of the turning triangle.
Sunday 22nd September 1963, barely a fortnight after Grantham shed closed.
Photograph by Hylton Holt.
From left to right the water treatment plant, the mechanical coaling plant, and the water tower and coal stage. In the middle distance, alongside the coal stage ramp, are old wagons and an old tender used for holding the wagons on the ramp. The van body on the right was used by staff working in the down side goods yard. Being so close to the coaling plant surely its stove was never short of fuel, and that extended chimney wouled draw the fire a real treat! The rusting rails diverging to bottom right alongside the van were a little-used connection from the Loco layout to the South Box via the goods yard. They provided an alternative route to and from the Loco in case the normal access, near the North Box, should become blocked. Sunday 22nd September 1963. Photograph by Hylton Holt.
From left to right the water treatment plant, the mechanical coaling plant, and the water tower and coal stage. In the middle distance, alongside the coal stage ramp, are old wagons and an old tender used for holding the wagons on the ramp.
The van body on the right was used by staff working in the down side goods yard. Being so close to the coaling plant surely its stove was never short of fuel, and that extended chimney would draw the fire a real treat!
The rusting rails diverging to bottom right alongside the van were a little-used connection from the Loco layout to the South Box via the goods yard. They provided an alternative route to and from the Loco in case the normal access, near the North Box, should become blocked.
Sunday 22nd September 1963.
Photograph by Hylton Holt.
The abandoned top shed on Sunday 22nd September 1963. Photograph by Hylton Holt.
The abandoned top shed on Sunday 22nd September 1963.
Photograph by Hylton Holt.

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Saturday 9th May 1964 (morning)

Class A1 No.60139 Sea Eagle of Doncaster (36A) standing in steam on one of the last three sidings remaining in place in the shed and yard*. Saturday 9th May 1964. Photograph by Hylton Holt. * the other two sidings were on the site of the demolished 'old shed'.
Class A1 No.60139 Sea Eagle of Doncaster (36A) standing in steam on one of the last three sidings remaining in place in the shed and yard.  The other sidings were formerly inside the demolished 'old shed'.  Saturday 9th May 1964.
Photograph by Hylton Holt.
Class A1 No.60139 Sea Eagle of Doncaster shed (36A) standing in steam on one of the last three sidings remaining in place in the former shed yard at Grantham. On the right is the rear wall of the demolished 'old shed'. Saturday 9th May 1964. Photograph by Hylton Holt.
Class A1 No.60139 Sea Eagle of Doncaster shed (36A) standing in steam on one of the last three sidings remaining in place in the former shed yard at Grantham. On the right is the rear wall of the demolished 'old shed'. Saturday 9th May 1964.
Photograph by Hylton Holt.
B1 No.61392 (of Doncaster, 36A but still carrying a 34F shedplate) arriving on what remained of Grantham shed, joining No.60139, on the morning of Saturday 9th May 1964. In the background the canopy over bay platform 4 and the north end of platform 3 has been stripped to its framework during demolition. Photograph by Hylton Holt.
Class B1 No.61392 (of Doncaster, 36A but still carrying a 34F shedplate) arriving on what remained of Grantham shed, joining No.60139, on the morning of Saturday 9th May 1964. In the background the canopy over bay platform 4 and the north end of platform 3 has been stripped to its framework during demolition.
Photograph by Hylton Holt.

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Saturday 9th May 1964 (afternoon)

We decided to go in search of Grantham's former Class A3 Pacifics, some of which had moved to New England shed, north of Peterborough, after Grantham shed closed in September 1963.  These were the engines which had most recently benefitted from a works overhaul and were not yet ready to join the procession to the scrapyard.  They were mainly kept on standby duty for the main line in case of diesel locomotive failure.

No. 60065 Knight of Thistle

Class A3 No.60065 Knight of Thistle in steam outside New England shed, Peterborough, on the afternoon of Saturday 9th May 1964. Photograph by Hylton Holt.
Class A3 No.60065 Knight of Thistle in steam outside New England shed, Peterborough, on the afternoon of Saturday 9th May 1964.
Photograph by Hylton Holt.

Built in 1924 as No. 2564, this locomotive was largely based in Scotland until 1950, when it spent a just over a year at King's Cross before becoming based at Grantham for most of the period between September 1951 and September 1963.

 

No. 60106 Flying Fox

Former Grantham-based Class A3 No.60106 Flying Fox in steam at the south end of New England shed, Peterborough, on the afternoon of Saturday 9th May 1964. It was in spotless condition after working a Gresley Society special the previous Saturday. Photograph by Hylton Holt.
Former Grantham-based Class A3 No.60106 Flying Fox in steam at the south end of New England shed, Peterborough, on the afternoon of Saturday 9th May 1964. It was in spotless condition after working a Gresley Society special (three photos - follow link and go to previous and subsequent photos) the previous Saturday.  The gantry above the tracks is for supplying water to locomotive tenders.
Photograph by Hylton Holt.

More about the celebrated locomotive Flying Fox

Originally numbered 4475 by the LNER and based at at King’s Cross from new in 1923 until 1940, Flying Fox became one of the most celebrated of the Gresley Class A1 (later A3) locomotives when, in 1927, it was selected to haul the inaugural run of a new and much-publicised non-stop service between London and Newcastle.

An extract from the LNER Magazine of August 1927:

KING'S CROSS TO NEWCASTLE;
THE L.N.E.R. RECORD NON-STOP RUN.

On July 11 1927 the L.N.E.R. made history by inaugurating a non-stop service between King's Cross and Newcastle — the longest non-stop railway run in the world. This new non-stop train will form an advance portion of the famous Flying Scotsman. It will run on Monday, Thursday, Friday and Saturday of each week during the period that summer train services are in force, and is booked to leave King's Cross at 9.50 a.m. and to cover the 268 miles from London to Newcastle in 5½ hours.
Five Pacific engines will take turns in performing the run, three from King's Cross Shed and two from Gateshead.

KING'S CROSS

Locomotives:
No.4475 Flying Fox; No.4474 Victor Wild; No.2552 Sansovino
Crews:
Driver A. Pibworth, Fireman H. Mutton; Driver B. Glasgow, Fireman H. Marriatt; Driver W. Prior, Fireman J. Andrews.

To Driver Pibworth and Fireman Mutton fell the honour of making the initial run with the Flying Fox engine.

LNER No.4475 Flying Fox departs from King's Cross on 11th June 1927 at 9.50am, non-stop for Newcastle. Photograph from The LNER Magazine, August 1927, used with permission.
LNER No.4475 Flying Fox departs from King's Cross on 11th June 1927 at 9.50am, non-stop for Newcastle.
Photograph from The LNER Magazine, August 1927, used with permission.
LNER Class A1 No.4475 Flying Fox arriving on Tyneside on 11th June 1927 having completed the longest non-stop run in the world. Photograph from The LNER Magazine, August 1927, used with permission.
LNER Class A1 No.4475 Flying Fox arriving on Tyneside on 11th June 1927 having completed the longest non-stop run in the world.
Photograph from The LNER Magazine, August 1927, used with permission.

[The above extract and photographs from The LNER Magazine are used with acknowledgement to the LNER as publisher and with kind permission from the Great Eastern Railway Society. The Society has funded and organised the magazine’s digitisation. The digital copy is highly recommended and can be ordered as a 2-DVD set here.]

By late in 1947 Flying Fox had become LNER No.106 and was a Grantham locomotive.   Again renumbered upon railway nationalisation in 1948 to 60106, it spent most of its operational career with British Railways based at Grantham.  On the closure of Grantham shed in September 1963 Flying Fox moved to New England, Peterborough as one of the dwindling number of serviceable A3s.  By the time it was taken out of service, on Boxing Day 1964 with more than 41 years on the East Coast Main Line under its belt, No.60106 had attained the highest recorded mileage of any A3 - and possibly of any main line steam locomotive - at 2,642,860 miles.

The left-hand side nameplate of No.60106 gleams in the sunlight at New England shed, Peterborough, on the afternoon of Saturday 9th May 1964. Photograph by Hylton Holt.
The left nameplate of No.60106 gleams in the sunlight at New England shed, Peterborough, on the afternoon of Saturday 9th May 1964.
Photograph by Hylton Holt.

 

No. 60112 St Simon

Class A3 No.60112 St. Simon of New England shed (34E) in steam outside its home shed on the afternoon of Saturday 9th May 1964. Its slight lean to the left indicates that perhaps attention to springs is overdue. Photograph by Hylton Holt.
Class A3 No.60112 St. Simon of New England shed (34E) in steam outside its home shed on the afternoon of Saturday 9th May 1964. Its slight lean to the left indicates that perhaps attention to springs is overdue.
Photograph by Hylton Holt.

This locomotive was based at Grantham from 1959 until 1963, but it spent most of its 41-year long career working from the sheds at Doncaster and at Copley Hill in Leeds.


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7 thoughts on “Photographs from the 1960s at ‘The Loco’, by Hylton Holt

  1. Eddie Smith

    Nice website.

    I saw Oliver Bury many times (also Bongo) on Broad Street locals to Finsbury Park etc I always wondered where it went after leaving this area.

    Reply
  2. Don Sellick

    Thank you for posting these. Very enjoyable and a reminder of long days spotting on Grantham Station in the early 60s. To think that we referred to Galtee More and Oliver Bury as local "Wrecks"! The sins of youth! It was designated a "wreck" if it was local and we saw it again and again. Oh if we could see them once more now!

    Reply
  3. Terry Mcwilliams

    I enjoyed these pics. I used to live at No. 2 Queen Street and schooled at Huntingtower and Springfield schools, so I saw trains all the time and as a lad used to go train spotting, cabbing and helped push the turntable round.
    As time passed I ended up working for Reads cans and enjoyed working with Roy Vinter who was a fireman. The photos of him on trains bring a smile to my face.

    Reply
    1. TracksthroughGrantham1

      Thanks very much for your memories Terry - I'll tell Hylton and Roy that you've been in touch.
      John Clayson

      Reply
  4. Jon Stubley

    Some great photos here. I saw many of the locos pass our house in Heckington on their way to either Frodingham, Skegness in summer, or Boston docks, (pacifics excluded, although they could be at weekends through Sleaford); and photos such as these show my fading memory the condition of the engines.

    I didn't get to do much spotting at Grantham because either I couldn't afford the fare, or the chances were the stationmaster would kick me off until the next train home was due.

    Thanks very much for the nostalgia.

    Reply
    1. TracksthroughGrantham1

      Thanks for your comments Jon. By 1962, closure having been decided upon and announced, Grantham shed was no longer recruiting engine cleaners. The diminishing number of cleaners were needed for more essential roles than keeping paintwork clean and bright, consequently the whole locomotive fleet had become dirty.
      John Clayson

      Reply

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